Falling Down

Falling is not just a physical accident. Falling means recognizing freely and sincerely the limits of our strength in the face of situations that are beyond us and force us to submit. Falling shows our human frailty. It reveals the fragile clay of which we are made, showing us that we are neither omnipotent nor invulnerable. Confronted with such a fall, we may nurture a spirit of revolt…. Or we may nurture a spirit of resignation…. There is a third possibility, however. We can nurture the spirit of humility. While calmly accepting our fall, we may still trust in God, whose strength comes to reinvigorate our weakness, and get up again with renewed courage.

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NOTE TO READERS:  Starting today, and for some undetermined length of time, I will need to suspend inward/outward due to having contracted pneumonia, complicated by a chronic heart condition and an overflow of ungrieved losses and exhaustion. This quote was already lined up before I knew that perhaps the Spirit had chosen it particularly for me. Oh, but I do see it now—I am the one falling; I am the fragile clay.

Thank you for your faithful reading, sharing, and posting in the past, and remember that all of the earlier Daily Words, and more, can be found again and again at www.inwardoutward.org. Keep digging for your own life’s truth. It’s closer than you might think, in every falling, getting up moment. – peace, Kayla

A Languid Spirit

O Lord and Master of my life,
remove from me this languid spirit,
this grim demeanor, this petty
lust for power, and all this empty talk.
Endow Thy servant, instead,
with a chaste spirit, a humble
heart, longsuffering gentleness,
and genuine, unselfish love.

Spiritual Stocktaking

Lent is a good moment for a spiritual stocktaking; a pause, a retreat from life’s busy surface to its solemn deeps. There we can consider our possessions; and discriminate between the necessary stores which have been issued to us, and must be treasured and kept in good order, and the odds and ends which we have accumulated for ourselves…. There are few who cannot benefit by a bit-by-bit examination of that equipment, a humble return to first principles; for there we find the map and road-book of that spiritual world which is our true environment.

A Season to Remember

This is the season of Lent, a season to remember the sufferings of Jesus Christ. A season to remember that to follow Christ is to take up our crosses and be servants of all. A season to remember Jesus’ question: “Are you able to drink the cup that I drink?” A season to ask ourselves how we might help to bear the cross. A season to ask ourselves how we are afraid and turn away. A season to ask what we have to offer. A season to give sacrificially to others.

The Unbearable

What is unbearable is not to suffer but to be afraid of suffering. To endure a precise pain, a definite loss, a hunger for something one knows—this it is possible to bear. One can live with this pain. But in fear there is all the suffering of the world: to dread suffering is to suffer an infinite pain since one supposes it unbearable.